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No Build Zone: Life in Tacloban After Typhoon Haiyan

When typhoon Haiyan, referred to locally as Yolanda, smashed into the central Philippines on November 8th, 2013, it was the most severe storm ever recorded to make landfall. In the end Yolanda claimed more than six thousand lives, devastated infrastructure, rendered tens of thousands homeless, and its aftermath instigated widespread looting and chaos. Tacloban, one of the cities hardest hit, was largely underprepared for the scale of the destruction, and nearly six months later its residents are still struggling to rebuild their lives.

Further complicating the recovery process is a government imposed “no build zone” that extends forty metres inland from the ocean, meaning that residents of some coastal neighbourhoods who have rebuilt their homes are now technically illegal squatters, possibly facing eviction and renewed homelessness in the future. With some estimates placing the clean up efforts at less than ten percent complete,  the residents of Tacloban face a long road to recovery.

This story documents daily life in Tacloban, largely focusing on Barangay 68, a community so badly damaged that residents now call it Yolanda Village.

Barangay 68, often referred to as Yolonda Village by locals, was one of the hardest hit by typhoon Haiyan. After Haiyan devastated the area, the government imposed a "no build zone" policy from the waters edge to 40 metres inland, meaning that those who have rebuilt their homes near the ocean face a possible eviction in the future.

Barangay 68, often referred to as Yolanda Village by locals, was one of the hardest hit by typhoon Haiyan. After Haiyan devastated the area, the government imposed a “no build zone” policy from the waters edge to 40 metres inland, meaning that those who have rebuilt their homes near the ocean face a possible eviction in the future.

Young men play basketball in front of a  beached cargo ship. Several large ships are awaiting removal after being swept onto land during typhoon Haiyan. Typhoon Haiyan struck the central Philippines on November 8, 2013, leaving more than 5000 dead and displacing nearly 2 million people homeless.

Tacloban, Philippines. Young men play basketball in front of a beached cargo ship. Several large ships are awaiting removal after being swept onto land during typhoon Haiyan.

A man inspects the remains of a friend's home. Typhoon Haiyan damaged many homes to the point that they became uninhabitable and have been left in disrepair. Typhoon Haiyan struck the central Philippines on November 8, 2013, leaving more than 5000 dead and displacing nearly 2 million people homeless.

A man inspects the remains of a friend’s home. Typhoon Haiyan damaged many homes to the point that they became uninhabitable and have been left in disrepair.

A carpenter rebuilds a destroyed home for his friends uncle just outside the government imposed "no build zone".

A carpenter rebuilds a destroyed home for his friend’s uncle just outside the government imposed “no build zone”.

The interior of the Palo cathedral outside Tacloban. The roof of the building was blown off during typhoon Haiyan and has yet to be repaired fully. Typhoon Haiyan struck the central Philippines on November 8, 2013, leaving more than 5000 dead and displacing nearly 2 million people homeless.

The interior of the Palo cathedral outside Tacloban. The roof of the building was blown off during typhoon Haiyan and has yet to be repaired fully.

Girls play in the remains of a building that was destroyed during typhoon Haiyan.

Girls play in the remains of a building that was destroyed during typhoon Haiyan.

A woman clears debris from her front yard in Yolonda Village. Nearly six months after typhoon Haiyan devastated the area, the hardest hit coastal neighbourhoods are still far from rebuilt.

A woman clears debris from her front yard in Yolonda Village. Nearly six months after typhoon Haiyan devastated the area, the hardest hit coastal neighbourhoods are still far from rebuilt.

A group of men drink brandy and wine on the beach during a day off.

A group of men drink brandy and wine on the beach during a day off.

A young family are seen in the window of their tin house.

A young family are seen in the window of their tin house.

A man walks along an improvised breakwater made of hardened cement bags.

A man walks along an improvised breakwater made of hardened cement bags.

Salvagers work to cut apart a cargo shipping container that washed up along the breakwater in Yolonda Village. Other containers can be found as far insland as 100 meters.

Salvagers work to cut apart a cargo shipping container that washed up along the breakwater in Yolanda Village. Other containers can be found as far insland as 100 meters.

Many residents of Yolonda Village remain without electricity nearly six months after typhoon Haiyan made landfall, and rely on rechargable LED lights to see at night.

Many residents of Yolanda Village remain without electricity nearly six months after typhoon Haiyan made landfall, and rely on rechargable LED lights to see at night.

A man salvages wood from a wrecked house frame to use in the reconstruction of his own house.

A man salvages wood from a wrecked house frame to use in the reconstruction of his own house.

A group of young men relax on a wooden fishing pier over the easter weekend.

A group of young men relax on a wooden fishing pier over the easter weekend.

Women seek shade under the hulls of several beached ships that were blown inland by typhoon Haiyan.

Women seek shade under the hulls of several beached ships that were blown inland by typhoon Haiyan.

A cargo ship and shipping container rest nearly 100 metres inland from the ocean. Nearly six months after the typhoon, the majority of debris remains uncleared.

A cargo ship and shipping container rest nearly 100 metres inland from the ocean. Nearly six months after the typhoon, the majority of debris remains uncleared.

A man sits in the window of his home in Barangay 68. Many of the locals have taken to calling the neighbourhood Yolonda Village, after the Filippino name for typhoon Haiyan.

A man sits in the window of his home in Barangay 68. Many of the locals have taken to calling the neighbourhood Yolanda Village, after the Filippino name for typhoon Haiyan.

Young men drink bottles of beer together  over the easter weekend in Tacloban.

Young men drink bottles of beer together over the easter weekend in Tacloban.

Reconstruction in Tacloban

Residents of Yolanda Village search for crabs and small fish to eat.

Boys play in the ocean near Yolonda Village.

Boys play in the ocean near Yolanda Village.

A young man plays guitar on a pier in Barangay 68, one of the neighbourhoods hardest hit by typhoon Haiyan.

A young man plays guitar on a pier in Barangay 68, one of the neighbourhoods hardest hit by typhoon Haiyan.

A group of spectators stand in the rain in front of a reenactment of Jesus' crucifixion over easter weekend. The Philippines is a predominantly Catholic country, with roughly 80% of Filipinos belonging to the faith.

A group of spectators stand in the rain in front of a reenactment of Jesus’ crucifixion over easter weekend. The Philippines is a predominantly Catholic country, with roughly 80% of Filipinos belonging to the faith.

 

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