Tag Archives: Yolanda

No Build Zone: Life in Tacloban After Typhoon Haiyan (Preview)

For most of the month of April I was working at a feverish pace in the Philippines, where I accepted a somewhat ambitious 11 assignments in a three week window. Despite an inconveniently timed three day fever (which caused me to pass out in front of about 50 Filipino cock fighting gamblers), unreliable communication networks, damaged equipment, and a visit from President Obama that brought air traffic to a standstill, everything miraculously got done.

Somehow, during the midst of all this running around, I found a few afternoons to visit some of the neighbourhoods in Tacloban most heavily damaged by typhoon Haiyan. The most powerful storm ever recorded to make landfall, Haiyan (or Yolanda as it is referred to locally), smashed into the central Philippines last November, killing thousands and rendering many more homeless. Nearly six months after the initial devastation, coastal residents of Barangay 68 – colloquially named Yolanda Village by residents – are struggling to rebuild what they lost.

Young men play basketball in front of a  beached cargo ship. Several large ships are awaiting removal after being swept onto land during typhoon Haiyan.  Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Young men play basketball in front of a beached cargo ship. Several large ships are awaiting removal after being swept onto land during typhoon Haiyan. Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Reconstruction in Tacloban

The catholic cathedral in Palo, on the outskirts of Tacloban, remains without a roof after it was torn off by the winds of typhoon Haiyan. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

Though cleanup efforts have had the full support of the community and assistance from international aid organizations, evidence of the destruction is everywhere. Several large cargo vessels rest unnaturally at the base of inland hills, roughly a hundred meters from the ocean. Shipping containers and other maritime debris can be found along the beaches and between rebuilt houses, like alien artifacts in the residential community.

For those who have managed to repair or replace the homes they lost, the challenges are far from over. A government mandated “no build zone” extends forty meters from the ocean, meaning that anyone who has rebuilt near the coast – and is therefore illegally squatting according to the law – could face homelessness again at any moment. While hospitality and friendliness are abundant for visitors to Yolanda village, for those who live there the road to recovery will be a long one.

Thousands of hardened cement bags are piled along the coast to build temporary piers and breakwaters. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

Thousands of hardened cement bags are piled along the coast to build temporary piers and breakwaters. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

Young men drink bottles of beer together  over the easter weekend. Many residents of Tacloban have lost their jobs due to storm damage and have little to do during the days. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

Young men drink bottles of beer together over the easter weekend. Many residents of Tacloban have lost their jobs due to storm damage and have little to do during the days. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

A young man plays guitar on a pier in Barangay 68, one of the neighbourhoods hardest hit by typhoon Haiyan. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

A young man plays guitar on a pier in Barangay 68, one of the neighbourhoods hardest hit by typhoon Haiyan. Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

These images represent a short preview of a larger set of pictures that I will post when I’ve had a chance to organize my archive and thoughts – and repair a broken laptop!

Posted in Blog, Disaster, Philippines Also tagged , , , , , |