Tag Archives: festival

The Passion of Iztapalapa

Early morning on Good Friday, actors and their crosses begin streaming into Iztapalapa for the annual Passion of the Christ procession.

Early morning on Good Friday, actors and their crosses begin streaming into Iztapalapa for the annual Passion of the Christ procession.

Since basing myself in Mexico City, most of my personal work has been focused on the water crisis for urban poor in Iztapalapa – the most populous of the city’s 16 boroughs. So when I heard that several million Catholic devotees would be converging on Iztapalapa to reenact the Passion of the Christ, complete with horses, costumes, and fake blood, I knew it was an event I had to cover.

I teamed up with Al Jazeera English, and the following text was originally published there along with a nice selection of images.

I’m adding a few unpublished pictures here, and if you’re interested in seeing the complete edit, you can look though my archives, here.

In short, the Iztapalapa Passion of the Christ is a photojournalist’s dream in terms of visual overload, and if you find yourself in Mexico City during Semana Santa (holy week), it is well worth the trip.

Catholic devotees carry a statue of the Virgin Mary through the streets of Iztapalapa, clouded in incese smoke.

Catholic devotees carry a statue of the Virgin Mary through the streets of Iztapalapa, clouded in incense smoke.

The Passion of Iztapalapa

Every April for the last 174 years, massive crowds have been gathering in Iztapalapa, Mexico City, to express their Catholic devotion at the annual Passion of the Christ procession. A country with a massive Catholic majority, with more than 80% of the population prescribing to the faith at the last census, the event brings in millions of spectators to Iztapalapa – already Mexico City’s most populous borough. They come to watch thousands of actors in full costume wind their way through Iztapalapa’s streets to the summit of Cerro de Estrella where Jesus’ crucifixion is reenacted, fake blood and all. The players come from all demographics, like Miguel Julian, a handyman from Iztapalapa who has been dressing as a Roman legionary for the last 17 years. When asked why he gives his time to sweat in the Mexican sun clothed in heavy leather armour, he says, “to give thanks to God.”

Actors playing Roman cavalry ride through the streets of Iztapalapa. Most of the horses for the annual event are on loan from the Mexico City police force. Despite being well trained, there are horse-related accidents nearly every year.

Actors playing Roman cavalry ride through the streets of Iztapalapa. Most of the horses for the annual event are on loan from the Mexico City police force. Despite being well trained, there are horse-related accidents nearly every year.

Young men dress as Roman legionaries for the 174-year-old Iztapalapa Passion of the Christ procession. Upwards of 10 000 actors will participate in the event.

Young men dress as Roman legionaries for the 174-year-old Iztapalapa Passion of the Christ procession. Upwards of 10 000 actors will participate in the event.

Local bands practice their marching songs for the annual Passion of the Christ procession. Participating in the event is seen as a sign of devotion and a point of pride for locals.

Local bands practice their marching songs for the annual Passion of the Christ procession. Participating in the event is seen as a sign of devotion and a point of pride for locals.

Unlike in other parts of Latin America where similar passion tributes dates back to Spanish colonial times, Iztapalapa’s event was formed after a cholera epidemic in 1843 ended. To express their faith that God had saved them from death, locals wrote and stages their own version of the Passion of the Christ – an event that has now grown to be one of the region’s largest religious events.

The procession has become a point of local pride for Iztapalapa, an urban sprawl on the Eastern edge of Mexico City home to nearly two million people. One of the city’s lowest income areas, Iztapalapa has been plagued with high crime rates and instances of domestic violence for years. The prestige and scale of the Passion procession is therefore a much needed source of honour for a community that is so often portrayed negatively in the news. “I’ve been coming to this event since I was a little boy,” said 38-year old taxi driver and Iztapalapa local Omar Zepeda. “I used to carry the crosses up the hill like the others, and it always made me feel proud that this event happens here in Iztapalapa.”

Catholic devotees dressed as Nazarenes begin the Passion of the Christ procession in Iztapalapa dragging 100kg (220 lb.) crosses behind them for the long walk to the summit of Cerro de Estrella.

Catholic devotees dressed as Nazarenes begin the Passion of the Christ procession in Iztapalapa dragging 100kg (220 lb.) crosses behind them for the long walk to the summit of Cerro de Estrella.

A cross-bearer takes a break from carrying his 100kg (220lb.) cross up the Cerro de Estrella. In the mid day sun, dragging the crosses up Iztapalapa's tallest mountain is an exhausting physical feat.

A cross-bearer takes a break from carrying his 100kg (220lb.) cross up the Cerro de Estrella. In the mid day sun, dragging the crosses up Iztapalapa’s tallest mountain is an exhausting physical feat.

After reaching the summit of Cerro de Estrella, people quickly drop their heavy crosses and rest in whatever shade they can find after the exhausting trek.

After reaching the summit of Cerro de Estrella, people quickly drop their heavy crosses and rest in whatever shade they can find after the exhausting trek.

While there are thousands of actors and participants in the parade, the competition for the main parts – especially Jesus – is fierce as the honour associated with such a role is immense. The actor who is chosen (this year 27-year-old Eder Omar Arreola Ortega won the part) must be able to drag a 100 kg (220 lb.) wooden cross for roughly six kilometres, much of which is uphill. In order not to collapse in front of the nation’s TV cameras, he must train up to six months in advance.

Young women in full costume wait in the streets as the procession is halted in the winding streets of Iztapalapa. An estimated 10 000 actors and actresses will participate in the event.

Young women in full costume wait in the streets as the procession is halted in the winding streets of Iztapalapa. An estimated 10 000 actors and actresses will participate in the event.

Up to 10 000 actors and actresses participate in the annual event, which winds for kilometres through the streets of Iztapalapa before ending on the summit of Cerro de Estrella.

Up to 10 000 actors and actresses participate in the annual event, which winds for kilometres through the streets of Iztapalapa before ending on the summit of Cerro de Estrella.

With an estimated 2-4 million spectators lining Iztapalapa's streets for the procession, a heavy police presence is needed to control the crowds.

With an estimated 2-4 million spectators lining Iztapalapa’s streets for the procession, a heavy police presence is needed to control the crowds.

Broadcast by satellite and now the Internet all across the Spanish-speaking world, Iztapalapa’s Passion of the Christ is only growing in popularity, just as the religion itself continues to gain ground in the developing world. And there is every indication that massive crowds will continue to gather on Cerro de Estrella for years to come.

An actor dressed as a Roman legionary prepares the wooden crosses at the summit of Cerro de Estrella on which Jesus will be crucified.

An actor dressed as a Roman legionary prepares the wooden crosses at the summit of Cerro de Estrella on which Jesus will be crucified.

27-year-old Eder Omar Arreola Ortega, the actor playing Jesus in this year's Passion of the Christ parade, carries his wooden cross to the summit of Cerro de Estrella. Being chosen to play Jesus is seen as a huge honor and the actor must train up to six months in advance for the phycial feat of dragging a 100kg (220 lb.) piece of wood up hill in the sun.

27-year-old Eder Omar Arreola Ortega, the actor playing Jesus in this year’s Passion of the Christ parade, carries his wooden cross to the summit of Cerro de Estrella. Being chosen to play Jesus is seen as a huge honor and the actor must train up to six months in advance for the phycial feat of dragging a 100kg (220 lb.) piece of wood up hill in the sun.

Jesus and one of the unnamed thieves he was crucified with hang from crosses on Cerro de Estrella, in a representation of his crucifiction.

Jesus and one of the unnamed thieves he was crucified with hang from crosses on Cerro de Estrella, in a representation of his crucifixion.

A tired devotee in Roman legionary's clothing takes a break after hoisting Jesus onto the cross.

A tired devotee in Roman legionary’s clothing takes a break after hoisting Jesus onto the cross.

After dying on the cross, disciples remove Jesus' crown of thorns towards the end of the annual Passion of the Christ procession.

After dying on the cross, disciples remove Jesus’ crown of thorns towards the end of the annual Passion of the Christ procession.

Actors carry Jesus' body down from Cerro de Estrella as the annual procession ends.

Actors carry Jesus’ body down from Cerro de Estrella as the annual procession ends.

Click here to see a longer edit of images from my archives.

Posted in Blog, Mexico Also tagged , , , , |

Water Festival Returns to Cambodia

Racing boat crews climb down the river embankment to their boats. Crews from all over Cambodia bring their own entourages to the festival, turning the river banks into makeshift villages. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Racing boat crews climb down the river embankment to their boats. Crews from all over Cambodia bring their own entourages to the festival, turning the river banks into makeshift villages. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River – an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture.

After a three year hiatus Bon Om Touk, or the Cambodian Water Festival, returned to the Kingdom last week. Meant to mark the the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap river – and the associated fishing and agricultural fertility that brings – the festival is one of the biggest holidays in Cambodia. Over three days of races, long boat crews from all over Cambodia converge on the capital, seeking to win honour (and hopefully a piece of the prize money) for their home towns.

Despite the historical and cultural importance of the festival, the tragic stampede incident in 2010, which saw roughly 250 dead and 750 injured led to the suspension of the event for three years – though strong arguments could be made that the government, fearing large gatherings of people during the past year of civil unrest, had ulterior motives for cancelling last year’s celebration.

Political agendas aside, it was clear from the lower-than-normal turnout that the memories of 2010 have had a stigmatic effect. In past years the estimated number of attendees was somewhere close to two million, whereas this year – despite having very little in the way of official census information – it was widely agreed that not even one million were present. Fear of a repeat disaster, it would seem, has tarnished the festival’s popularity.

Diminished crowds aside, the festival is still one of the most significant events in the Cambodian calendar year, and worth checking out if you’re in Phnom Penh at the right time.

A boat crew dances on the first morning of the water festival. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A boat crew dances in the early morning of the first day of the annual Cambodian water festival, 2014. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

A racing boat moves along the Tonle Sap for pre-race practice runs. Many event spectators have come from distant regions of Cambodia, and camp along the river banks for the duration of the festival. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A man watches the early morning practice sessions from his hammock. With such an influx of spectators, many of whom have come from the countryside to support their local racing team, parts of the east bank of the Tonle Sap in Phnom Penh turned into an informal campground.  Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

Racing boats moves along the Tonle Sap for pre-race practice runs. Though the prize for winning boats is relatively small, sponsorships and private donations can make winning a profitable prospect. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A boat crew move aboard their racing boat in the early morning, warming up before the first of the day’s races. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

A race crew receives last minute equipment from their supporters before beginning practice runs ahead of their race. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A race crew receives last minute equipment from their supporters before beginning practice runs ahead of their race. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

A racing boat coach encourages his teams before their race. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A racing boat coach encourages his teams before their race.

A racing boat moves along the Tonle Sap for pre-race practice runs. Though the prize for winning boats is relatively small, sponsorships and private donations can make winning a profitable prospect. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Racing boat crews are roughly 50 strong, and around 250 boats participated in this year’s festival. Though the prize for winning boats is relatively small, sponsorships and private donations can make winning a profitable prospect. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

Racing boats moves along the Tonle Sap for pre-race practice runs. Though the prize for winning boats is relatively small, sponsorships and private donations can make winning a profitable prospect. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Racing boats move down the Tonle Sap river. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

 

A racing boat crew warms up on the Tonle Sap river before their race. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A boat from Kampong Chhnang passes under the Japanese bridge in Phnom Penh before going on to win its race.  Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

Water Festival Returns To Cambodia For First Time Since 2010 Stampede Tragedy

Racing teams speed down the Tonle Sap river. With nearly 250 boats participating, the boats are often moving in very close proximity to each other.

Two boats pass under the Japanese bridge in Phnom Penh during a race. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Two boats pass under the Japanese bridge in Phnom Penh during a race. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

A racing boat moves along the Tonle Sap after having finished a race. Though the prize for winning boats is relatively small, sponsorships and private donations can make winning a profitable prospect. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

A racing boat moves past spectators after finishing their race.

Members of the palace guard escort Brahmin priests from the royal palace to the river where the day's races will be held. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Members of the palace guard escort Brahmin priests from the royal palace to the river where the day’s races will be held. VIPs, from the King to the Prime Minister, attended the races, often sponsoring teams of their own. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

Children play in front of Phnom Penh's royal palace. Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Children play in front of Phnom Penh’s royal palace. Though attendance numbers were much lower than in past years, the riverfront was still a buzz of activity.  Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

Festival goers walk past a brightly lit portrait of King Norodom Sihamoni near Phnom Penh's royal palace.   Cambodia’s annual 3-day water festival celebrates the reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River - an event of large cultural significance because of the river’s role in national fishing and agriculture. The event was cancelled for three previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Festival goers walk past a brightly lit portrait of King Norodom Sihamoni near Phnom Penh’s royal palace. Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

Fireworks explode over the Tonle Sap river.   because of the river’s role in previous years in a row after the stampede incident in 2010, when nearly 350 people were killed and roughly 750 more were injured.

Fireworks explode over the Tonle Sap river after the day’s races have finished.  Luc Forsyth/Getty Images.

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