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Stuff I Liked This Month – September 2016

Like most people I seem to spend an inordinate amount of time on the internet reading articles, watching short videos, and looking for inspiration among the millions of new things uploaded everyday. While a lot of what is forced down our throats these days is clickbait trash, every once in a while I stumble across something genuinely of interest to me as a photojournalist, videographer, and more broadly as a human being.

Enjoy this random collection of things I liked from the internet from the last days of August through to the close of September.

To see what I liked last month, click here.

1. Cameraperson – Directed by Kirsten Johnson

Part documentary, part video memoir, Cameraperson is one of the most unique looking pieces of filmmaking I know of when it comes to relating the experiences of doing documentary work – and more broadly about the power of the work itself. The autobiographical details of director Kirsten Johnson’s decades of experience as an international videographer will appeal to those interested in, or currently engaged in, the field of documentary media, while the socio-cultural perspectives on global issues and the media make it much more than a behind-the-scenes piece for industry insiders.

The New York Times says of Cameraperson:

“In the course of her career, Ms. Johnson has found herself in dangerous and somber places, as a witness to some of the worst inhumanity of the recent past. She returns several times to Foca, Bosnia, the scene of mass rapes and killings during the Balkan wars of the ’90s, and also visits Darfur, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay and Manhattan’s ground zero. “Cameraperson” isn’t a work of journalism or advocacy. It’s a scrapbook, a found poem assembled out of scraps and snippets of truth.”

The film is currently on the indie festival circuit (where it looks to be racking up awards) so I’m not sure when exactly it will be available for mainstream audiences, but this is a film I’m going to keep tabs on.

Visit the official website for the film, here.

2. How a French Photographer Made Intimate Photos of Refugees (or The Ethics of Working With Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs))  – James Estrin/The New York Times Lens Blog

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Copyright Marie Dorigny. Click on image to read the full article.

This article by my friend and mentor Jim Estrin was technically written last month, but it’s too relevant to photojournalism to ignore. Photographer Marie Dorigny, the main subject of the article sums up one of the dominant issues for those working in documentary photography today:

“There are no more magazines that will send us on humanitarian social stories. They don’t care anymore and they don’t want to put money on these stories. The NGOs are willing to use photo reporters, and it’s an opportunity for us to keep working on the stories we care about.”

While it’s not necessarily true that there are no more magazines that will pay for humanitarian reporting, the list is dwindling by the day and the only ones who seem to see any of the limited funds that still exist are typically big name photographers with prestigious awards under their belts – and all the power to them. But for those, like me, whose names are not industry-wide brands yet are still living full time from visual storytelling, finding the money to pursue in depth projects is a constant challenge.

In fact, in the last fours years of work, the longest assignment I have ever received from the mainstream media has been six days, and that was an outlier. One or two days is more the norm. This isn’t an indictment of media as they are all dealing with their own well-publicized financial woes, but it does mean that photographers like me who want to pursue long-term stories need to look elsewhere for support – and more often than not, that means reaching out to NGOs.

My recently completed two-year documentation of the Mekong river was funded entirely by the non-profit sector, and despite producing roughly 50 pieces of multimedia journalism, we never received a cent from any media organization. That would seem to indicate that the new trend is to bypass the media altogether and work exclusively with the non-profit sector, but the solution isn’t that neat. Working with major media outlets provides both a legitimacy and scale of distribution that just can’t be matched by NGOs alone, and  the work produced with NGOs can be dismissed as being a piece of advocacy rather than journalism.

This article discusses some of the ins and outs of NGO/photojournalist partnerships, and gives some examples of noteworthy photographers who have stepped away from the media to get personal projects accomplished. This is an issue that will likely stick with my colleagues and I for the foreseeable future, and so I highly recommend reading it.

3. Use Your Photography Skills to Master Video – Jessica Dimmock/CreativeLive

If you work in the documentary photography world, odds are you have been repeatedly bombarded people telling you that you need to start shooting video immediately if you are to have any chance of long-term survival. This two-day course from award-winning photographer Jessica Dimmock of the VII Photo Agency takes a slightly gentler approach in branching the topic. Rather than preying on the fears that photojournalists have about the seismic shifts in the industry to force them to adopt video, Jessica Dimmock takes a different approach.

Through in-depth discussions of gear, methodology, logistics, and, more importantly, intention and motivation, she instead shows how exploring videography can compliment still photography and open up new opportunities that might not have existed otherwise. After watching this course (which spans more than 12 hours) I was left with a feeling of excitement about how video could enhance my projects rather than the normal gloom of obligation that often goes with this topic.

One of the best online education experiences I’ve had to date, I took this course when it streamed for free on launch. Now priced at $129 for lifetime access, if you are serious about trying to bring videography skills into your toolkit, this is far cheaper than any workshop that I know of and a great value. Dimmock is a solid and engaging teacher, and far from a patronizing overview for total beginners, this course delivers what it promises – sound, practical advice for experienced photographers who want to expand their skill set and start producing moving stories.

Visit the course page here

4. So Good They Can’t Ignore You – by Cal Newport

screen-shot-2016-09-15-at-4-05-20-pmThe anti-self help book I wish I’d read years ago, So Good They Can’t Ignore You is based around the simple premise that the predominant career advice of the last 40 years – follow your passion – is terrible advice. This has been spouted by everyone from high school guidance counsellors to Steve Jobs, and it is easy to be attracted to these types of ideas. After all, who doesn’t want to believe that simply enjoying something is the key to success?

But as Newport points out, Jobs didn’t build Apple because he was passionate about technology. In fact, quite the opposite. Jobs was a barefoot, LSD-taking hippy who took a job at Atari so that he could have enough disposable income to pursue his real passion of zen meditation. What is omitted in the legendary story of how Jobs built the first Apple computer in his garage is the fact that he saw the endeavour as a chance to make some money, and it was by no means a passion project. It was only later, after he had built the company into something real that he began to actually love what he did.

Newport argues that this is true of many successful people. Rather than following their passions, they slowly but steadily built up a skill set that provided value to the world, and then leveraged these skills into deeply meaningful careers that they grew to love because they got so good at them.

Through examples of high achievers like Jobs (and many, many others), Newport suggests that a deliberate blue-collar work ethic that allows you to grow your value is what will eventually define a career that you love, not divinely inspired passion. In fact, believing that passion should be the driving force behind your career is dangerous as it can lead to chronic dissatisfaction whenever the day to day going gets tough – which it will.

This is especially relevant to people considering a future in photojournalism, as in my experience only long-term deliberate practice will have any impact on your career. All the passion in the world will not land you your first assignment or build your portfolio. Instead you will feel discouraged when you don’t make any progress, no matter how in love with the medium you may be. What will pay off, however, is building up a skills that are valuable to clients, and that can only be done through tedious and repetitive practice.

Obviously this is not to say that you should not be passionate about what you are doing, but that passion alone is not enough. I have met quite a few aspiring documentary photographers over the last several years who have asked me for meetings or sent me emails to tell me how they have just realized they want to dedicate the rest of their lives to photojournalism, and want to know the best way to get started. But when I answer them that they should probably expect to spend at least the first two-three years building up their skills without expectation of recognition or getting paid, their eyes tend to glaze over. Surely, they seem to think, I just don’t understand how much they want it, and that I am missing the obvious fact that they are outliers who don’t need to suffer the drudgery of practice. I can say this because I often felt the same way.

But looking back, I can safely say that Newport is right – passion is not usually enough to get off the ground. What counts is learning to be good at something, and with time the passion will catch up. Unfortunately this is not sexy advice and it is much more satisfying to dive headfirst after your dreams. But if I’d read this book when starting out and listened its suggestions, I would have likely progressed much faster than I did.

5. The News is Dead, So What Comes Next? – Canadaland Podcast

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-2-00-19-pmThis podcast’s own host admits at the end of the episode that putting “Canada” in the name of the show is
a surefire way to discourage a mainstream audience from listening to it, but I promise that this 30 minute show is relevant not only to Canadians, but for anyone who works with or near media.  The show’s guest is Ian Gill, the author of No News is Bad News: Canada’s Media Collapse―and What Comes Next, asserts that Canada’s (the world’s) major media outlets have utterly failed at their job of keeping the public informed about the everyday events that impact their lives. While this is an obviously pessimistic standpoint, he also delves into non-mainstream services that have picked up the slack and which now, Gill says, do a much better job than the traditional news outlets.

This podcast is thematically connected to Jim Estrin and Marie Dorigny’s article that made the #2 slot on this month’s list, and the two go well together if you’re trying to wrestle with what the future looks like for journalists and storytellers in a post-newspaper world.

Click here to leave this site and steam the podcast.

Click here to stream this podcast in a separate tab.

For the full collection of “Stuff I Liked This Month” articles, and other relevant resources for photojournalists and videographers, click here. 

 

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Stuff I Liked This Month – August 2016

Like most people I seem to spend an inordinate amount of time on the internet reading articles, watching short videos, and looking for inspiration among the millions of new things uploaded everyday. While a lot of what is forced down our throats these days is clickbait trash, every once in a while I stumble across something genuinely of interest to me as a photojournalist, videographer, and more broadly as a human being.

I’m going to start posting a small selection of things I’ve come across at the end of every month (travel schedule permitting), in the hopes that others will find these things as helpful as I have and as part of an effort to share interesting work that isn’t necessarily my own.

Enjoy.

1. Listening to the Voices from the Hijabi World – Ed Kashi/Talking Eyes Media

Ed Kashi (VII Photo) is a household name for those in documentary photography, and is known as one of the hardest working and most committed photojournalists/filmmakers around. Ed has become a literal mentor to me (and 15 other emerging photojournalists and documentarians) as part of the three year advanced mentorship program I was lucky enough to be accepted to, and so I was able to see an advanced screening of this short film, produced by Talking Eyes Media, before it was officially released.

To me this video is emblematic of why Ed has been so successful in this hyper-competitive field. He has taken a complex and sometimes divisive topic (the stereotyping of Muslim women wearing the hijab in America) and presented it in a deceptively simple, yet hugely effective way. By giving the voice back to those people actually affected by this issue instead of asserting his own judgements and preconceptions, this film is far more successful in its objective than it might otherwise be.

2. The Fishermen of Elmina, Ghana by Tomasz Tomaszewski

A ritual happens in the fish market in Elmina at the beginning of the fishing season. It is supposed to influence in a positive way the harvest of the fish by local fisherman. © Tomasz Tomaszewski. Click on the image to see the full essay on Lens Culture.

A ritual happens in the fish market in Elmina at the beginning of the fishing season. It is supposed to influence in a positive way the harvest of the fish by local fisherman. © Tomasz Tomaszewski. Click on the image to see the full essay on Lens Culture.

Tomasz Tomaszewski is a photographer, a long time National Geographic contributor, and a photographic educator originally hailing from Poland. I came across this photo essay after a friend posted it on social media and I was immediately blown away by the imagery. Taking such a quiet and simple-seeming topic and producing such strong material is what makes a photographer great.

See the full essay here. 

3) Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday

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I picked up the audio version of this book after hearing it repeatedly recommended on various podcasts and found it to be highly applicable to photojournalistic work. Not only is photography an industry which highly prizes the reputation and personal brand of the individual over the work that they do (see Magnum’s John Vink “The Photographer is Not a Hero”), but the pressures of expanding that ego can often lead to near nervous breakdowns for young people trying to get their foot in the door.

I personally have worked myself into fits of panic in the past because my social media following wasn’t big enough, or because I hadn’t appeared in the world’s most prestigious publications, or because someone had given me negative feedback on my work. While I have (mostly) been able to move past these types of unproductive obsessions over the last years, I found Ryan Holiday’s modern distillation of Stoic philosophical principles extremely applicable to this line of work.

A few takeaways I found especially useful:

  1. Always be a student. If you think that you’re the best at something, you’ll be unwilling to learn. Without being willing to learn, you’ll never improve. For anyone heading into their first (or hundredth) portfolio review, this is hugely important. I left the first formal photo critique I ever had feeling angry at the person for not loving my images, and in the end I missed a major opportunity to learn.
  2. You will always be unappreciated. Deal with it and work through it. One of the hardest things about breaking into the photojournalism world is that it seems as though no one is willing to give you a chance. Holiday’s point is that this is always the case, and it really shouldn’t matter. If you aren’t doing the work for yourself (i.e. your ego needs to be constantly stoked by the praise of others), then you probably shouldn’t be doing it at all.
  3. Know what you want. This was one of the most resonant chapters of this book for me personally. As Holiday says, if you don’t know what you are actually working towards, the default answer is always “more”. It is only recently that I have been able to see what I am actually trying to achieve in this line of work, and that has helped me filter out many distractions that used to drive me crazy.

I won’t go into to much detail as this book is very accessible and informative of its own accord, but I would highly recommend its lessons to anyone in the photojournalism or any other creative industry.

You can buy the book here.

4) The Boreal Bash – The Boreal Collective, Oaxaca Mexico. October 28-November 3, 2016.

The Boreal Collective is one of North America’s premiere documentary photography groups, and I’ve been fortunate enough to meet some of its members who were, beyond being talented photographers, very nice people. The Boreal Bash is an annual event that they organize that helps young photographers get feedback and inspiration at reasonable prices. In a time when photo workshops can often run into the thousands of dollars, the fact that this group puts in so much effort for so little money (relatively speaking) is a breath of fresh air.

Moreover, the fact that they are taking this show on the road to Mexico in an effort to bring photographic education to people who might not otherwise be able to access it is a wonderful gesture. If you’re just starting out and are looking for guidance, consider heading to Oaxaca this October or supporting their fundraising campaign.

5) What Makes a Good Life? – Lessons from the World’s Longest Study on Happiness from Harvard

I found this video through the always interesting Brainpickings blog curated by Maria Popova.

This TED Talk is by Robert Waldinger, the fourth director of a 75-year study on happiness by Harvard University. Researchers have tracked the lives of hundreds of people to try and determine what factors lead to a happy life. The answer they’ve found is both simple and perhaps cliche, but that doesn’t make it any less true. In a period where many young people see the road to happiness as being necessarily lined with fame and money, the findings of the study are highly relevant.

 

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The Necessity of Sacrifice: 5 Steps to Creative Success (Part 3)

Based on a series of presentations at Chattanooga State College, This is part three of a five part series on challenges faced by creative professionals. Click here to read Part 1: Nothing Happens Fast, and here for Part 2: Don’t Do it for the Money.

Manila, Philippines. Angelica, 8, plays with her siblings in a stairwell next to her family shack near the Osmena highway. When her father lost his job, the family of six was forced to move into a squatter's shack measuring just 2 meters squared. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Manila, Philippines. Angelica, 8, plays with her siblings in a stairwell next to her family shack near the Osmena highway. When her father lost his job, the family of six was forced to move into a squatter’s shack measuring just 2 meters squared.      ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Since 2007, when I began living more or less permanently outside of Canada, I have attended exactly one major family event – Thanksgiving, 2013. Though I have been able to get home for sporadic visits, I have been a largely absentee family member, missing birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, and child births. At 17 I made most major decisions in my life based on a desire to get as far away form my hometown as possible, but as time passes the distance from my family has become more difficult to stomach. My extreme wanderlust has slowly given way to a gentle, yet nagging guilt that I should be home more often. The problem is that the photojournalism career that I have slowly built for myself is, at the moment, entirely dependent on my living overseas.

Koh Kong, Cambodia. A Buddhist monk begins his 25km trek out of the remote Areng Valley after a multi-day environmental protest. Buddhist monks are entering the political sphere in Cambodia, mostly in opposition of government corruption. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Koh Kong, Cambodia. A Buddhist monk begins his 25km trek out of the remote Areng Valley after a multi-day environmental protest. Buddhist monks are entering the political sphere in Cambodia, mostly in opposition of government corruption. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

When I first decided to pursue independent photojournalism, I didn’t appreciate that I was making a lifestyle decision as much as, if not more than, a job choice. With the proliferation of cheap, high quality cameras, and the ability to self-educate on the Internet, there have never been as many people aspiring to do my job. Very early on, I was warned by a veteran war photographer that if I wanted to stand out, I would have to be willing to give up certain things that constitute a normal life for most people: stability, consistency, and familial relationships, to name a few. Enamoured with the seemingly glamorous lifestyle of a traveling documentary photographer, I was quick to assert my willingness to go without these common staples of life. And while it has turned out to be the best decision I have ever made, the sacrifices take more of a mental toll on me with each passing year.

That is not to say I regret the path I have chosen – on the contrary, I am in the somewhat surprising position of being able to do what I love. But virtually all of my successes along the way have been almost as much a result of the sacrifices I have been willing to make as my skill as a photographer. It goes without saying that your images need to be of a certain calibre if you expect to get paid for your work, but being good is expected these days – how much a person is willing to sacrifice is, in my opinion, as important as photographic prowess. I’ve met many aspiring photojournalist with incredible portfolios to prove they have the requisite artistic and technical skills, yet they are unable to land enough paid assignments to support themselves. Some are (perhaps understandably) unwilling to leave their lives in New York, London, or Paris, which pits them against some of the most well known and established names in the industry. Others don’t want to give up the guaranteed income of their existing jobs to take the plunge into full time freelancing. Whatever the reasons, and however logical they may be, this refusal to sacrifice often prevents these gifted people from achieving their full potential.

Dhaka, Bangladesh. Muslims pray during the holy month of Ramadan. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Dhaka, Bangladesh. Muslims pray during the holy month of Ramadan. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

It is not necessary to move to the opposite side of the world in order to find engaging stories, and there are many ways to make a living as a photographer other than freelancing. These steps fit with my goals and financial situation, but are by no means a formula for success. The lack of face-to-face contact with my family and my surrendering of a steady pay cheque are just two examples of sacrifices I’ve made in order to make things work, and each individual has to decide for themselves what they can realistically give up.

Someone with a young baby cannot, in good conscience, pack up and move to India, but maybe a sacrifice for them could be as simple at packing a lunch to take to work everyday instead of eating out. The extra $10 per day saved could finance a month-long trip, or go into a savings account that will help them weather the transition from their old jobs to their new paths. Conversely, a wealthy banker who decides they want to quit the financial world for a life of documenting human rights issues will not have the same monetary concerns as most people, but will have to give up their comfortable condo or luxury car for the challenges of life on the road. In fact, Marcus Bleasdale from the renowned VII Photo Agency did exactly this, and is now one of the most respected photojournalists in the world. Bleasdale told The Telegraph that at one point he was earning £500,000 per year as an investment banker, owning two houses and a Porsche 911. For his most recent projects he spent months at a time traveling through open pit mineral mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and witnessing the horrors of the genocide taking place in the Central African Republic. Trading a life  of weekend skiing in the Alps for the life-threatening conflict zones of central Africa is admittedly an extreme example of sacrifice, but he clearly finds the satisfaction of reporting the underreported to be worth the tradeoff.

Kolkata, India. A batsmen approaches the wickets during an afternoon practice. These players are members of club teams and many aspire to play at the state or national level. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Kolkata, India. A batsmen approaches the wickets during an afternoon cricket practice. These players are members of club teams and many aspire to play at the state or national level. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

From the professional athlete who chose to forgo the temptations of a debaucherous college life in order to master their sport, to the Hollywood superstar who worked overtime at Starbucks so they could afford to keep going to auditions, the path to success is often littered with sacrifices. Society loves to dwell on the meteoric risers, such as Justin Bieber, who shot from high school obscurity to entertainment icon seemingly overnight, yet more often than not the struggle towards greatness is defined by a series of uphill battles in a long war of attrition. This, to me, seems like the way the world should work. Those who are willing to give up the most and work the hardest deserve to be considered the best, and the only honest way to speed up the process is to identify the elements in your life that are not advancing your goals.

So quit smoking, ride a bike to work, or stop buying name brand clothes. Get a part time job, or quit a soul-sucking one. Drink water instead of Perrier. There is endless fat that can be trimmed from most people’s lives, including my own, and while everyone needs to decide for themselves what they can and can’t live without, the ones who sacrifice, whether they be photographers, lawyers, or NASCAR drivers, are probably the ones who we will remember.

Click here to read Part 1: Nothing Happens Fast

Click here to read Part 2: Don’t Do it for the Money

 

 

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Don’t Do it for the Money: 5 Steps to Creative Success (Part 2)

Based on a series of presentations at Chattanooga State College, This is part two of a five part series on challenges faced by creative professionals. Click here to read Part 1: Nothing Happens Fast.

A young family in San Andres, Manila. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

A young family in San Andres, Manila. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

A recent survey from Forbes Magazine placed journalist (they used the moniker “newspaper reporter”, but I think it’s safe to count these as being roughly the same thing) at number nine in the top ten list of the most stressful jobs in the world. The official list published is as follows:

1)    Enlisted Military Personnel (Soldier)

2)    Military General

3)    Firefighter

4)    Airline Pilot

5)    Event Coordinator

6)    Public Relations Executive

7)    Senior Corporate Executive

8)    Police Officer

9)    Newspaper Reporter (journalist/photojournalist)

10)  Taxi Driver

This list looks pretty fair to me – all these jobs seem to be relatively stressful and I don’t think any of them are out of place. What jumped out at me were the disparities in income between various jobs. I can see how being the CEO of a major company would be less than relaxing, or how hard-working PR agents could burn themselves out in a high-stakes industry. But for these jobs they are rewarded financially, whereas the same Forbes list estimates the median income of working journalists at $36 000 per year, compared to $146 000 for a commercial pilot. The only jobs on the list that pay less than journalism are taxi driver and soldier. So why do people do them?

I would argue that driving a taxi is a job undertaken out of necessity rather than passion. While there may be some drivers out there who love going to work each morning, and wouldn’t dream of doing anything else, to my understanding it is generally the sort of thing people do to earn money when they can’t find anything better. A friend of mine drove a cab when he moved across the country and needed money quickly to pay the rent on his new apartment, but once he got on his feet he moved on and never looked back. There is nothing wrong with being a professional taxi driver (to the contrary, if you love what you do then you’ve already won in life), but I don’t normally think of it as being a driving passion in someone’s life. I don’t remember any of my classmates in the first grade declaring that when they grew up they wanted be a taxi driver, for example. Driving a cab is something people do because they need to make ends meet – a straightforward exchange of money for services rendered.

Koh Kong Province, Cambodia. Koem Bunloerum, 30, enjoys a moment of reflection in the Areng Valley. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

Koh Kong Province, Cambodia. Koem Bunloerum, 30, enjoys a moment of reflection in the Areng Valley. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom

According to Forbes, soldiers make only about $5000 a year more than taxi drivers, but the jobs seem worlds apart in terms of what motivates the people who do them. Sure, there are probably large numbers of enlisted military personnel who sign up because they are in financial or personal trouble and see no other alternative, but these people are likely to accept a discharge as soon as they possibly can. A career soldier, however, must have an entirely different outlook on his or her job. In order to risk your life for less than the price of a mid-range car, there has to be something that makes it all feel worthwhile. Never having been a soldier I can only speculate, but I imagine it has something to do with feeling like they are a part of something larger and more important than themselves. They see themselves as the guardians of their country (all political opinions aside), and in their eyes what they do is important. Others may disagree with them, but for those who thrive in military careers there is probably nothing else in the world they’d rather be doing.

If taxi drivers and soldiers, the first and second lowest paying jobs on the Forbes list, were surveyed, which of them would likely report a higher job satisfaction? I say soldier almost every time. Most taxi drivers would probably quit their jobs the moment something higher-paying came along, but I would wager that it would be much harder to convince a dedicated marine to leave the service. According to the list, a military general makes more than five times as much as an enlisted man. But to become a general, one first needs to be a soldier for many, many years. If all they cared about was a paycheck, there are certainly easier (and safer) ways to make a living. The best soldiers stay in uniform because they think it is something worth doing, and the same mentality has to apply to anyone who wants to succeed as a creative professional.

During my first full year of being a “professional” photojournalist, I was paid in sandwiches. I was working for a small independent magazine in South Korea, and they had literally zero budget for paying contributors – apart from advertiser-donated gift certificates. One publication earned me one meal. But sandwich or no, I would have made these stories anyways. There are innumerable articles floating around the internet that deplore the practice of working for free as destroying the market for paid professionals, and for the most part I agree with them. Giving high quality work away for free so that others can profit from it is a slippery slope, and should be avoided at all costs. At that point in my career, however, I was barely literate in my craft – and truth be told, looking back on those first clumsy attempts, I don’t think they were deserving of paid compensation. In the end, learning to work with a photo editor on a deadline was worth far more in the long run than a few hundred dollars that I wouldn’t have remembered spending.

Darjeeling, India. Nawang Chonzom, 83, sits inside her house in a centre for Tibetan refugees. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

Darjeeling, India. Nawang Chonzom, 83, sits inside her house in a centre for Tibetan refugees. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

When I eventually decided to leave the magazine and strike out on my own as a full-time freelancer, I spent my life savings (twice) before landing a single paid publication. I shot stories in eight countries, and each one was a little better than the last, but still money eluded me. I would send pitches to only the most prestigious publications in the world, and when I received no reply I took it as a sign that the stories were not good enough. While this was extremely discouraging at times, I still went out everyday for four to five hours and hunted for stories.

Why? Because I loved doing it. Even now, when my entire income is derived from documentary photography and writing, if I found an interesting story that nobody was interested in publishing, I would still shoot it. If I was born into a richer family, or if I had scooped up some rental properties in an up-and-coming neighbourhood – making money a non-issue – I would still do exactly the same thing. In the end it took more than three years to start getting paid for my efforts, and even now it is only possible to survive on what I make because I’ve worked hard to keep my lifestyle as cheap as possible.

Manila, Philippines. Men passing a bottle of rum in San Andres. Excessive drinking is common in Manila’s lower class neighbourhoods, as the price of alcohol is extremely low in the Philippines. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

Manila, Philippines. Men pass a bottle of rum around a circle in San Andres. Excessive drinking can be common in Manila’s lower class neighbourhoods, as the price of alcohol is extremely low in the Philippines. ©Luc Forsyth/Ruom.

These days, particularly in photography, people seem desperate to be recognized as professionals rather than receive the dreaded label of amateur. Some will give their work away for a pittance in exchange for a promise of exposure, often to profit making organizations (as opposed to free independent magazines that genuinely cannot pay). But the word amateur derives from the Latin amare: “to love.” I would suggest that in the hyper-competitive and image-saturated modern world, it will be the people who work because they love doing it that will succeed above the ones looking for a big payout. Just like a soldier who puts on a uniform because of what it represents over what it pays, the best in most creative fields tend to be people for whom money is secondary to the gift of being able to do what is important to them.

In order to really prosper in a creative field like photography, writing, or filmmaking, even the most well respected professional needs to be an amateur at heart. Figuring out what sort of work is important enough for you to dedicate your life to is the hardest part. The rest is just logistics.

This is the second part in a multipart series. Click here to read Part One: Nothing Happens Fast.

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