Category Archives: Black and White

Farewell, Cambodia

Children play in the alleyways that lead into Borei Keila. The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

Children play in the alleyways that lead into Borei Keila. The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

When I got on the China Eastern airlines flight that would take me out of Cambodia after living and working in the Kingdom for nearly three years, my emotions were predictably volatile. Cambodia had fostered me when I had been lacking direction and adrift in the beginnings of a new career, and as time progressed and I started traveling more and more on assignments, had given me a safe harbour to return to between trips. Cambodia allowed me to call it home even though I had little to offer in exchange.

I met hundreds of people – both Khmers and foreigners alike – who had welcomed, taught, and inspired me at different times and in different ways. From a portfolio review on my third week in the country by the prolific Magnum photographer and long-time Cambodia hand John Vink to my last assignment photographing anti-logging activist Ouch Leng for The New York Times almost three years later, Cambodia helped me to develop as a photographer faster than I ever thought possible.

A street scene in Borei Keila in the evening as adults begin to return from work. The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

A street scene in Borei Keila in the evening as adults begin to return from work.

It was in Cambodia that I learned, through Ruom Collective, that working in a team can often result stronger work than any one individual, no matter how dedicated, could accomplish. It was also there that I met photographer Gareth Bright, who would become my chief partner in crime for nearly two years of exploring the Mekong river and who taught me more about the style and art of photography than any formal education could have. Without a doubt I left Cambodia in better form than when I’d arrived.

But what about the Cambodians themselves? Populated by some of the kindest and most peaceful people I’ve ever encountered after nearly a decade of international travel, had Cambodia become a better place for its own people to live?

Admittedly this is a much more complex question than I am temporally and intellectually capable of answering (for one of the best overviews of modern Cambodia, try Hun Sen’s Cambodia by Sebastian Strangio), but I can draw conclusions based on my time interacting with Cambodians across all sectors of society. And unfortunately, what I saw was not, for the most part, positive.

A group of women gamble to pass the time in Borei Keila. With few employment opportunities, many residents of the community have little to do during the day, leading to high instances of gambling. The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

A group of women gamble to pass the time in Borei Keila. With few employment opportunities, many residents of the community have little to do during the day, leading to high instances of gambling.

In his farewell address to Southeast Asia after a decade of reporting from the region, New York Times journalist Thomas Fuller said “I came to see Southeast Asia as a land of great people and bad governments, of remarkable graciousness but distressing levels of impunity.” This sentiment matches perfectly with my own experiences in Cambodia, and it makes me fear for the future of the country and its people.

Despite a protracted period of widespread protests and sporadic-yet-savage violence in 2014, the incumbent Cambodian People’s Party maintained its grip on power and steadily continued its attack on any organization or person who threatened its authority. The gap between rich and poor widened to ever more ludicrous distances and corruption spread deeper throughout the nation’s governmental and bureaucratic institutions. Public servants with tiny salaries bought $15 million houses in Phnom Penh while working class families, both in the cities and countryside, were evicted from their homes to make way for luxury condominiums and hydropower dams.

The community of Borei Keila is a microcosm of a trend that has been happening throughout Cambodia since before I arrived, and is likely to continue long after I have left. The images that appear throughout this article were all taken in Borei Keila over a period of several months, and were the last serious subject matter I documented for any length of time before leaving the country. The process of making these photographs, therefore, greatly influenced my final impressions of a country I called home for three years.

A couple watch over their three grandchildren. The children were left in their care when the children's mother developed a drug addiction and left Phnom Penh. The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

A couple watch over their three grandchildren. The children were left in their care when the children’s mother developed a drug addiction and left Phnom Penh.

In 2003, the property development conglomerate Phanimex was awarded development rights to the area and promptly evicted the hundreds of families who lived there. While some were provided with new housing, many hundreds more were offered no compensation and were forced to remain in the site, living in squalid slums without basic infrastructure, such as plumbing. Waste removal services were unreliable, and over time a two meter tall mound of festering garbage rose behind the squatter shacks, bringing thick swarms of flies.

More than 10 years later in January of 2016, the issue was supposedly resolved and a formal ceremony was held in Borei Keila, replete with representatives from City Hall. Yet the final “resolution” (either a new apartment, a small plot of land in the countryside, or a cash payment for remaining Borei Keila residents), beyond being offered more than a decade too late, still neglected to offer anything 35 families. What will happen to these people I have no idea. Based on the past, it seems unlikely that either the government or Phanimex does either.

One is left with the distinct impression that no one in a position of power cares what happens.

A man tends to his flock of chickens which he keeps inside an abandoned apartment unit in Borei Keila. The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

A man tends to his flock of chickens which he keeps inside an abandoned apartment unit in Borei Keila.

In the climate of mega-tycoons and oligarchs that has taken nearly complete control of the power mechanisms of Cambodia, it is extremely unlikely that anyone will be held accountable for the consequences of such neglect. These are the “distressing levels of impunity” that Fuller refers to, and they have come to define both the Kingdom as well as much of the wider region.

As I leave Cambodia for Latin America I am acutely aware of how much I benefitted from my time in the country, both personally and professionally, which in turn makes me conscious of how few of the same benefits are available to the average Cambodian.

There are, it should be said, noteworthy examples of an emerging young middle class who are thriving despite the challenges they face. My good friend and colleague Kimlong Meng, for example, who has built himself a thriving local media empire on the back of his own hard work and creativity. A team of five under-30 independent Khmer entrepreneurs founded Brown, a chain of modern cafes that have come to dominate Phnom Penh’s coffee culture. There are others.

A family lays on the floor of their home as they check their cell phones.The community of Borei Keila in Phnom Penh was once home to hundreds of families before land developer Phanimex bought the property rights to the area and forcefully evicted the residents who refused to accept their compensation package. Those who remained were forced to squat in the remains of the buildings, living in slum-like conditions and without access to plumbing or public electiricity.

A family lays on the floor of their home as they check their cell phones.

Yet as I sat on the tarmac waiting for my flight to take me out of Cambodia, I couldn’t shake the feeling that for most Cambodians things were going to get harder. It brings no pleasure to project negativity onto a people and culture that is so deserving of prosperity, and I sincerely wish the best for the country that treated me with such incredible kindness. But until some significant changes take place at the highest levels, I can’t help but fear that more Borei Keilas will be created by the decisions of those with impunity.

Until the majority of Cambodians can thrive in their own country as I was able to, it will be hard to remember my time in the Kingdom without a tinge of sadness.

Farewell for now Cambodia, and good luck.

For more images of Borei Keila, have a look at my personal edit of 20 pictures, or this even longer archival edit of nearly 30 pictures

Also posted in Blog, Cambodia, Poverty Tagged , , , , , , |

March of the Monks: Black and White

I used to love black and white photography. The stark images from people like Don McCullin and James Nachtwey, were some of the reasons I was drawn to photojournalism in the first place. When I first started taking pictures more seriously, the first step in my post-production workflow was to immediately convert them to black and white. But when I tried to switch to colour photography during those years, I found that all my images looked washed out and bland.

So a few years ago I needed to remedy the situation and started shooting exclusively in colour. In the last year and a half the number of black and white’s I’ve made is in the single digits, which is a shame since it was the format that I originally fell in love with.

In an effort to try and recapture what I used to love about black and white, I decided to make a second edit of my Marching Monks story. It might be an odd choice for a return to monochrome, since the saffron-clad monks are so iconically colourful, but it really changes up the feeling of the story.

I’ve held off on showing the full story, in colour, because my written account of the protesting monks has been picked up by a large media organization (which will remain unnamed until I’m completely sure they will publish it!).

I’d be very interested to hear what people think about the strengths and weaknesses of black and white vs colour, so if you think that one is better than the other, I’d love to know why. Post a comment at the end of this post, on Twitter or Facebook, or email me directly to get a dialogue going about which one works best.

Monks stand in from of a roadside restaurant

Monks stand in from of a roadside restaurant

Monks drive past rows of rubber trees on their way to the Areng Valley. Foreign owned rubber plantations are a commonm cause of deforestation in Cambodia.

Monks drive past rows of rubber trees on their way to the Areng Valley. Foreign owned rubber plantations are a commonm cause of deforestation in Cambodia.

A colum of monks begin their walk towards Pra Lay, a small village in the Cordomom Mountains. The monks are hours behind schedule and their destination is 25km away.

A colum of monks begin their walk towards Pra Lay, a small village in the Cordomom Mountains. The monks are hours behind schedule and their destination is 25km away.

Darkness falls on the marching monks early in their walk.

Darkness falls on the marching monks early in their walk.

The monks are of varying ages and fitness levels, and many must stop to rest periodically.

The monks are of varying ages and fitness levels, and many must stop to rest periodically.

Sun rise in Pra Lay village. Despite their late arrival, most monks rise with the sun.

Sun rise in Pra Lay village. Despite their late arrival, most monks rise with the sun.

The monks eat a breakfast of rice and curried vegetables. Buddhist monks do not eat anything past noon each day and so a large breakfast is essential.

The monks eat a breakfast of rice and curried vegetables. Buddhist monks do not eat anything past noon each day and so a large breakfast is essential.

Monks unfurl an 80-metre length of saffron cloth which they will use to bless trees during their protest.

Monks unfurl an 80-metre length of saffron cloth which they will use to bless trees during their protest.

The monks walk through the rainforest the morning after the march, searching for large trees to bless as holy.

The monks walk through the rainforest the morning after the march, searching for large trees to bless as holy.

The monks bless the large trees in the hopes that being seen as holy will protect them from being cut down. Many hardwood trees in Cambodia are extremely valuable, and therefore desirable for independent (and illegal) loggers.

The monks bless the large trees in the hopes that being seen as holy will protect them from being cut down. Many hardwood trees in Cambodia are extremely valuable, and therefore desirable for independent (and illegal) loggers.

The monks swim in the Areng River after their tree blessing ceremony. Many of the monks are still exhausted from the previous night's march and welcome an afternoon of relaxation.

The monks swim in the Areng River after their tree blessing ceremony. Many of the monks are still exhausted from the previous night’s march and welcome an afternoon of relaxation.

A monk enjoys a moment of reflection before starting the 25km walk out of the Areng Valley.

A monk enjoys a moment of reflection before starting the 25km walk out of the Areng Valley.

Also posted in Blog, Cambodia Tagged , , , , , , |