Monthly Archives: September 2016

The Road to the Source

Horse riders along the highway cutting through Golok region, TIbet (Qinghai, China).

Horse riders along the highway cutting through Golok region, Tibet.

“Welcome to Tibet,” Tashi said as we walked out of the Xining airport after a 30-hour series of flights through mainland China. A former Buddhist monk turned Tibetan travel expert, Tashi would be our companion for the final leg of A River’s Tail as we made our final approach towards the source of the Mekong at the Lasagongma Springs.

Because of the difficulty of obtaining unrestricted travel permits for the Tibetan Autonomous Region, we’d had to abandon a portion of the Mekong and instead had decided on a more circuitous route to the river’s source. Beginning in the city of Xining, we would make a 4000km overland round trip through Qinghai province. And while the province fell under a Chinese name on the map, we quickly realized that this land was Tibet in all but official title.

A family walks through the snow in Darlag, Tibet (Qinghai, China). Darlag is one of the major cities of the Golok region.

A family walks through the snow in Darlag, Tibet. Darlag is one of the major cities of the Golok region.

Locals gather on the streets of Darlag, Tibet (Qinghai, China). Darlag is one of the captials of the Tibetan region of Golok.

Locals gather on the streets of Darlag, Tibet.

After spending a year and a half tracing the Mekong from its terminus at the South China Sea, Tibet was a special place to be ending our travels. Beyond being the literal geographical source of the Mekong, Tibet was also on the front lines of the biggest water-related threats facing the planet.

Tibet possess the largest supply of the world’s freshwater outside of the Arctic and Antarctica, earning it the nickname of The Third Pole. The waters that flow out of its plateau are the basis of all of Asia’s major rivers – the Mekong included – and sustain upwards of a billion lives.

Horses are transported in the back of a truck in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China).

Horses are transported in the back of a truck in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China).

Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China).

Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China).

Over the course of our time in Tibet we would learn about more than just the source of the Mekong. The powerful bonds between culture and the environment, the grave threats to regional water security, and the extreme selflessness exhibited by many Tibetans people in their mission to keep the plateau healthy for the benefit of those who lived downstream were all distinctly Tibetan characteristics.

The Black Tent

“A black tent, a black tent!” Tashi called excitedly as he pointed out the window of our car to a small settlement on the side of the highway. The solitary tent sat at the base of rolling foothills that stretched across the horizon, and apart from lines of prayer flags blowing in the cold wind, was the only feature on the barren winter landscape.

A family tent made from woven black yak hair in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China). Tents woven from yak hair are becoming increasingly rare as Tibetan nomads adopt modern materials such as plastic or tarpaulin.

A family tent made from woven black yak hair in Golok region. Tents woven from yak hair are becoming increasingly rare as Tibetan nomads adopt modern materials such as plastic or tarpaulin.

“This is really rare,” Tashi explained, “tent culture is dying out very fast in Tibet. Most of the nomadic families these days have Chinese-style buildings at their winter camps. Soon you won’t see this at all.”

As we approached the tent we were too distracted by the monstrous Tibetan mastiff guard dogs (that seemed as though they would gladly eat us for breakfast if not staked to the ground with heavy chains)  to notice what was unique about the black tent. While we were impressed by the toughness of any family who could live under a piece of cloth in the freezing temperatures of the Tibetan plateau in winter, from a distance the tent itself did not look like anything special. It was only when we got close enough to touch it that we realized that rather than a single piece of canvas, the walls were woven from thousands of individual strings of yak fur.

A mastiff fights against its restraints on a nomad winter camp in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China). Mastiffs are used throughout Tibet to protect the livestock of nomadic families from wolves and snow leopards.

A mastiff fights against its restraints on a nomad winter camp in Golok region, Tibet.

Hearing the frenzied barking of their dogs, two women emerged from the tent and surveyed us uninterestedly, exhibiting neither hostility or curiosity. Somewhat surprisingly, they made no effort to engage us in conversation or ask us what we wanted. Instead they mostly ignored us, and set to work weaving coarse tufts of yak hair into yet more threads, presumably to expand or repair the existing tent walls.

To be in such close proximity to other people, in their personal space nonetheless, and not interact with them in any meaningful was a strange experience and somewhat awkward for us after having speaking to so many people along the Mekong. Yet these nomadic women didn’t appear bothered in the least and simply continued with their task until we left, seeming neither annoyed or happy.

A nomadic woman winds yak hair into thread outside her family tent in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China). Tents woven from yak hair are becoming increasingly rare as Tibetan nomads adopt modern materials such as plastic or tarpaulin.

A nomadic woman winds yak hair into thread outside her family tent.

A nomadic woman winds yak hair into thread outside her family tent in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China). Tents woven from yak hair are becoming increasingly rare as Tibetan nomads adopt modern materials such as plastic or tarpaulin.

A nomadic woman winds yak hair into thread outside her family tent.

We were on our way to the monastery town of Payul (Baiyuxiang in Mandarin), but first we had hundreds more kilometres of grassland to cross through landscapes that were both utterly hostile looking and stunningly beautiful in their vastness. Apart from the periodic groups of pilgrims trudging along the side of the road and an occasional pickup truck loaded with wild-looking racing horses, it was easy to feel like we were alone in the sheer hugeness of the place.

Occasionally we passed more winter camps of Nomad families, most of whom had built permanent structures rather than the black yak hair tents, shielded from the bitter winter winds by head-height walls made exclusively from yak dung. Small children, their cheeks almost artificially red from wind burn as if they had been interrupted while experimenting with their mother’s makeup, stood in the subzero temperatures wearing little more than thin wool sweaters.

It was hard country, and the people who lived on it had to work hard to make it work for them.

Culture on the Move

“Once these people start moving into [permanent] houses the group culture starts to fall apart,” Tashi said as we stood on a bluff overlooking a sprawling complex of uniform single story homes. “Traditionally they live together in tents that are bigger than a house and take years to build from yak pelts. But most of these ‘real’ nomads are already gone.”

Relocation camps meant to bring nomadic families into permanent residences are spread across an open plain in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China)

Relocation camps meant to bring nomadic families into permanent residences are spread across an open plain in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China)

A community of newly built houses meant to accommodate Tibetan Nomads in Golok region, Tibet. Such communities are part of an effort by the Chinese government to keep nomadic Tibetans stationary and contained, but as there are few opportunities for employment or livestock rearing, many of the homes sit empty.

A community of newly built houses meant to accommodate Tibetan Nomads in Golok region, Tibet. Such communities are part of an effort by the Chinese government to keep nomadic Tibetans stationary and contained, but as there are few opportunities for employment or livestock rearing, many of the homes sit empty.

For nomads, who typically move with their yak herds three times per year between summer, winter, and autumn locations, the residential compound spread across the valley below was essentially an internment camp, a place where culture would suffocate and eventually die.

“In the old days there was no concept of land ownership,” Tashi explained. “Nomad families and tribes used to move together and share land. This started to change in the 1980’s when the government started assigning land to families, and surrounding this land with fences.”

It was strange to think of the impact something so simple as a fence could have on an ancient way of life, but as nomadic families started to think of land as their personal property, disputes and violent conflicts began to increase. People who had defined their culture through the sharing of land and resources for thousands of years were becoming divided. And while it seemed, from a distance, that the vast majority of the government-built housing compound was empty, it nevertheless represented a grave threat to (and possibly even the slowly approaching end of) nomadic culture.

Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China).

Golok region, Tibet.

A yak skull is mounted to a nomadic family's storage shed in Golok region, Tibet (Qinghai, China).

A yak skull is mounted to a nomadic family’s storage shed in Golok region.

But as ominous as the camp was, for the time being most nomads were not yet abandoning their traditional lifestyle. They faced threats from many angles, including the growth of massive industrial mining operations in the region and the degradation of grasslands so essential to the survival of their herds. But for people living in such relative isolation there was little to be done apart from tend to their yaks and hope to be left alone.

In Tibet, as in countless other places along the Mekong, 21st century issues of climate change, environmental degradation, land development, and the over exploitation of resources were most affecting those people who had done the least to precipitate the problems.

As we would see over the coming weeks, however, Tibetans were not resigned to inaction. Perhaps more so than any other group of people we had encountered along the Mekong, Tibetans were fighting to preserve what they had.

A River’s Tail is a year long collaborative multimedia journey exploring the Mekong river from sea to source. The following article originally appeared on the project’s main page and the images shown here represent only my part of the project’s creative output. To view the project as it was intended, I encourage you to visit the project’s main page by clicking here to follow the full journey.

Posted in A River's Tail, Blog, Environmental, The Mekong River, Tibet, Water Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Stuff I Liked This Month – September 2016

Like most people I seem to spend an inordinate amount of time on the internet reading articles, watching short videos, and looking for inspiration among the millions of new things uploaded everyday. While a lot of what is forced down our throats these days is clickbait trash, every once in a while I stumble across something genuinely of interest to me as a photojournalist, videographer, and more broadly as a human being.

Enjoy this random collection of things I liked from the internet from the last days of August through to the close of September.

To see what I liked last month, click here.

1. Cameraperson – Directed by Kirsten Johnson

Part documentary, part video memoir, Cameraperson is one of the most unique looking pieces of filmmaking I know of when it comes to relating the experiences of doing documentary work – and more broadly about the power of the work itself. The autobiographical details of director Kirsten Johnson’s decades of experience as an international videographer will appeal to those interested in, or currently engaged in, the field of documentary media, while the socio-cultural perspectives on global issues and the media make it much more than a behind-the-scenes piece for industry insiders.

The New York Times says of Cameraperson:

“In the course of her career, Ms. Johnson has found herself in dangerous and somber places, as a witness to some of the worst inhumanity of the recent past. She returns several times to Foca, Bosnia, the scene of mass rapes and killings during the Balkan wars of the ’90s, and also visits Darfur, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay and Manhattan’s ground zero. “Cameraperson” isn’t a work of journalism or advocacy. It’s a scrapbook, a found poem assembled out of scraps and snippets of truth.”

The film is currently on the indie festival circuit (where it looks to be racking up awards) so I’m not sure when exactly it will be available for mainstream audiences, but this is a film I’m going to keep tabs on.

Visit the official website for the film, here.

2. How a French Photographer Made Intimate Photos of Refugees (or The Ethics of Working With Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs))  – James Estrin/The New York Times Lens Blog

screen-shot-2016-09-15-at-4-03-43-pm

Copyright Marie Dorigny. Click on image to read the full article.

This article by my friend and mentor Jim Estrin was technically written last month, but it’s too relevant to photojournalism to ignore. Photographer Marie Dorigny, the main subject of the article sums up one of the dominant issues for those working in documentary photography today:

“There are no more magazines that will send us on humanitarian social stories. They don’t care anymore and they don’t want to put money on these stories. The NGOs are willing to use photo reporters, and it’s an opportunity for us to keep working on the stories we care about.”

While it’s not necessarily true that there are no more magazines that will pay for humanitarian reporting, the list is dwindling by the day and the only ones who seem to see any of the limited funds that still exist are typically big name photographers with prestigious awards under their belts – and all the power to them. But for those, like me, whose names are not industry-wide brands yet are still living full time from visual storytelling, finding the money to pursue in depth projects is a constant challenge.

In fact, in the last fours years of work, the longest assignment I have ever received from the mainstream media has been six days, and that was an outlier. One or two days is more the norm. This isn’t an indictment of media as they are all dealing with their own well-publicized financial woes, but it does mean that photographers like me who want to pursue long-term stories need to look elsewhere for support – and more often than not, that means reaching out to NGOs.

My recently completed two-year documentation of the Mekong river was funded entirely by the non-profit sector, and despite producing roughly 50 pieces of multimedia journalism, we never received a cent from any media organization. That would seem to indicate that the new trend is to bypass the media altogether and work exclusively with the non-profit sector, but the solution isn’t that neat. Working with major media outlets provides both a legitimacy and scale of distribution that just can’t be matched by NGOs alone, and  the work produced with NGOs can be dismissed as being a piece of advocacy rather than journalism.

This article discusses some of the ins and outs of NGO/photojournalist partnerships, and gives some examples of noteworthy photographers who have stepped away from the media to get personal projects accomplished. This is an issue that will likely stick with my colleagues and I for the foreseeable future, and so I highly recommend reading it.

3. Use Your Photography Skills to Master Video – Jessica Dimmock/CreativeLive

If you work in the documentary photography world, odds are you have been repeatedly bombarded people telling you that you need to start shooting video immediately if you are to have any chance of long-term survival. This two-day course from award-winning photographer Jessica Dimmock of the VII Photo Agency takes a slightly gentler approach in branching the topic. Rather than preying on the fears that photojournalists have about the seismic shifts in the industry to force them to adopt video, Jessica Dimmock takes a different approach.

Through in-depth discussions of gear, methodology, logistics, and, more importantly, intention and motivation, she instead shows how exploring videography can compliment still photography and open up new opportunities that might not have existed otherwise. After watching this course (which spans more than 12 hours) I was left with a feeling of excitement about how video could enhance my projects rather than the normal gloom of obligation that often goes with this topic.

One of the best online education experiences I’ve had to date, I took this course when it streamed for free on launch. Now priced at $129 for lifetime access, if you are serious about trying to bring videography skills into your toolkit, this is far cheaper than any workshop that I know of and a great value. Dimmock is a solid and engaging teacher, and far from a patronizing overview for total beginners, this course delivers what it promises – sound, practical advice for experienced photographers who want to expand their skill set and start producing moving stories.

Visit the course page here

4. So Good They Can’t Ignore You – by Cal Newport

screen-shot-2016-09-15-at-4-05-20-pmThe anti-self help book I wish I’d read years ago, So Good They Can’t Ignore You is based around the simple premise that the predominant career advice of the last 40 years – follow your passion – is terrible advice. This has been spouted by everyone from high school guidance counsellors to Steve Jobs, and it is easy to be attracted to these types of ideas. After all, who doesn’t want to believe that simply enjoying something is the key to success?

But as Newport points out, Jobs didn’t build Apple because he was passionate about technology. In fact, quite the opposite. Jobs was a barefoot, LSD-taking hippy who took a job at Atari so that he could have enough disposable income to pursue his real passion of zen meditation. What is omitted in the legendary story of how Jobs built the first Apple computer in his garage is the fact that he saw the endeavour as a chance to make some money, and it was by no means a passion project. It was only later, after he had built the company into something real that he began to actually love what he did.

Newport argues that this is true of many successful people. Rather than following their passions, they slowly but steadily built up a skill set that provided value to the world, and then leveraged these skills into deeply meaningful careers that they grew to love because they got so good at them.

Through examples of high achievers like Jobs (and many, many others), Newport suggests that a deliberate blue-collar work ethic that allows you to grow your value is what will eventually define a career that you love, not divinely inspired passion. In fact, believing that passion should be the driving force behind your career is dangerous as it can lead to chronic dissatisfaction whenever the day to day going gets tough – which it will.

This is especially relevant to people considering a future in photojournalism, as in my experience only long-term deliberate practice will have any impact on your career. All the passion in the world will not land you your first assignment or build your portfolio. Instead you will feel discouraged when you don’t make any progress, no matter how in love with the medium you may be. What will pay off, however, is building up a skills that are valuable to clients, and that can only be done through tedious and repetitive practice.

Obviously this is not to say that you should not be passionate about what you are doing, but that passion alone is not enough. I have met quite a few aspiring documentary photographers over the last several years who have asked me for meetings or sent me emails to tell me how they have just realized they want to dedicate the rest of their lives to photojournalism, and want to know the best way to get started. But when I answer them that they should probably expect to spend at least the first two-three years building up their skills without expectation of recognition or getting paid, their eyes tend to glaze over. Surely, they seem to think, I just don’t understand how much they want it, and that I am missing the obvious fact that they are outliers who don’t need to suffer the drudgery of practice. I can say this because I often felt the same way.

But looking back, I can safely say that Newport is right – passion is not usually enough to get off the ground. What counts is learning to be good at something, and with time the passion will catch up. Unfortunately this is not sexy advice and it is much more satisfying to dive headfirst after your dreams. But if I’d read this book when starting out and listened its suggestions, I would have likely progressed much faster than I did.

5. The News is Dead, So What Comes Next? – Canadaland Podcast

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-2-00-19-pmThis podcast’s own host admits at the end of the episode that putting “Canada” in the name of the show is
a surefire way to discourage a mainstream audience from listening to it, but I promise that this 30 minute show is relevant not only to Canadians, but for anyone who works with or near media.  The show’s guest is Ian Gill, the author of No News is Bad News: Canada’s Media Collapse―and What Comes Next, asserts that Canada’s (the world’s) major media outlets have utterly failed at their job of keeping the public informed about the everyday events that impact their lives. While this is an obviously pessimistic standpoint, he also delves into non-mainstream services that have picked up the slack and which now, Gill says, do a much better job than the traditional news outlets.

This podcast is thematically connected to Jim Estrin and Marie Dorigny’s article that made the #2 slot on this month’s list, and the two go well together if you’re trying to wrestle with what the future looks like for journalists and storytellers in a post-newspaper world.

Click here to leave this site and steam the podcast.

Click here to stream this podcast in a separate tab.

For the full collection of “Stuff I Liked This Month” articles, and other relevant resources for photojournalists and videographers, click here. 

 

Posted in Blog, Photojournalism Tips Tagged , , , , , , , |

A Singular Purpose: Hydropower in Northern Yunnan

The village of Yamen, Yunan, China, sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river. A hydropwer dam will innundate the village when completed, and most residents will be forcibly relocated.

The village of Yamen sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river in northern Yunnan. A hydropwer dam will innundate the village when completed, and most residents will be forcibly relocated.

“If you were born somewhere, how would you feel about having to move to someone else’s place?” Chen Quiangguo asked rhetorically.

After leaving the Tibetan community of Cizhong, we had decided to follow up on some rumours locals had shared that the nearby village of Yanmen was set to be flooded by the reservoir of the soon-to-be completed Wunonglong hydropower dam. Relocating villagers to make way for dams was something we had encountered repeatedly throughout our journey, but in this case the residents of Yanmen were not to be given a new piece of land but rather they were to be absorbed into Cizhong.

Rays of sunlight fall on the mountains around Deqen, Yunnan, China.

Rays of sunlight fall on the mountains around Deqen.

Whereas the most common challenge faced by dam migrants was how to go about creating a new community from scratch – often in an undesirable location far from schools, hospitals, employment, and other important infrastructure – in this case the situation had been flipped. How could an entire village be joined with another without severely straining the available land of the host? Before continuing north towards the Tibetan plateau, we stopped in Yanmen to ask how residents planned to deal with the problem. It was there we met Chen Quiangguo, sitting on a plastic cooler along Yanmen’s main thoroughfare.

“I have lived here my whole life,” Chen said, “and now the whole village is going to be evicted. I am not sure where we will go when I lose my farmland.” His life was in a state of uncertainty, and with Wunonglong set to be operational in 2018, he did not have much time to make a decision.

A man walks along a mountain road near Deqen, Yunnan, China.

A man walks along a mountain road near Deqen.

Like the people we had spoken to in Xialuoga who too faced the prospect of abandoning much of their town to a dam’s reservoir, Chen directed most of his anger at local government more so than at the national level.

“I think the power company [Sinohydro] is more powerful than the local government. Whenever we disagree with the company we report it to the local government, but I don’t think they have much power over the company,” he explained. Considering that Sinohydro was a state-owned corporation – and one of the biggest companies of any kind in all of China – he was most likely right.

Engineering Might

20km away along a winding mountain highway, the build site of the Wunonglong dam was not the high security location that we’d expected it to be. Instead of guards and gates a special viewing platform had been build to accommodate tourists, complete with decorative gardens and informational diagrams showing the location of all present and future dam projects on the Lancang. China clearly saw its massive damming projects as a source of engineering pride, something to be marvelled at rather than hidden away.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang (Mekong) river in Yunan, China.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company.

From the lookout perched above the deep river valley where Wunonglong was being built, it was hard not to be struck by the monumental scale of the construction. Hulking industrial dump trucks were reduced to moving yellow dots, and the workers were nothing more than specks identifiable only by their brightly coloured hardhats.

Where the Lancang should have flowed there was instead a plain of gravel and metal scaffolding that covered the valley walls like latticework. Even more impressive was the fact that the river had not been blocked, but rather diverted in its entirety through a tunnel that had been carved through the base of the surrounding mountains. Despite the environmental ramifications of such dams for China’s downstream neighbours and the human cost of flooding huge tracts of land, this manifestation of China’s engineering prowess was truly awesome to behold.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang (Mekong) river in Yunan, China.

Scaffolding is anchored into the rock walls of a Lancang river valley as workers carve the rock away.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang (Mekong) river in Yunan, China.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang (Mekong) river in Yunnan, China.

Back in Yanmen with a clearer visual picture of the source of the village’s destroyer, we spoke to shopkeeper Ge Dacheng about his future plans. Like Chen Quiangguo, he was uncertain as to his future: “I will be evicted next year I think. Because I rent my shop and do not own the land, I do not have as much to lose [as some others in Yanmen], but I do not know where I will go. I’ll have to see what housing is available and what it costs.”

As the current plan encouraged most of Yanmen’s residents (at least those who could not afford to move to bigger cities) to move to Cizhong, Ge and Chen were at least fortunate that people in Cizhong were not unanimously opposed to their arrival. The prospect of giving away inherited farmland to a community of incoming strangers could have sparked deep resentment in Cizhong and made assimilation all but impossible.

A grave or historical marker overlooks the Lancang (Mekong) river near Deqen, Yunan, China. Fast flowing and oxydized to its blue-tint from the copper rich mountains, the river originates far to the north on the Tibetan plateau.

A grave or historical marker overlooks the Lancang (Mekong) river near Deqen.

Graves overlooking the Lancang (Mekong) in northern Yunnan.

Graves overlooking the Lancang (Mekong) in northern Yunnan.

However, when we’d asked 64-year-old wine maker and Cizhong land-owner Zeng Tei how he felt about an influx of newcomers, he responded optimistically.

“I heard they are making this community bigger,” Zeng had said. “I don’t know why these people need to come here, but I don’t think it’s a danger to my family. In the past people here used to be starving, but now things are plentiful. I hope that when new people come I will have a bigger market for my crops – and that they will buy more of my wine!”

Towards the Plateau

While our first reaction to China’s network of dams might have been to rail and shout about the ecological damage being done to the Lancang (and later the Mekong) – as well as the hardships looming for those who had to be relocated to make way for their reservoirs – after spending upwards of a month following the river through Yunnan province, we realized that this would not be entirely fair.

Though the Mekong was a transnational waterway, directly supporting the livelihoods of more than 60 million people in Southeast Asia, international borders and the modern geopolitical system meant that governments were prone to put their own national development interests before those of their neighbours. Though after more than a year on the Mekong we had our own left-of-centre views regarding the future ramifications of such insular thinking, this was nevertheless the reality of modern politics.

A Tibetan walks along the Lancang (Mekong) river near Deqen, Yunan, China. Fast flowing and oxydized to its blue-tint from the copper rich mountains, the river originates far to the north on the Tibetan plateau.

A Tibetan walks along the Lancang (Mekong) river near Deqen, Yunnan. Fast flowing and oxydized to its blue-tint from the copper rich mountains, the river originates far to the north on the Tibetan plateau.

And time after time in China (with only a few rare exceptions), we had seen that the Lancang was not a particularly useful river for the people who lived along it. Whereas in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, millions of people fished in the muddy brown waters, irrigated their rice paddies, or transported their goods along the Mekong, the fast-moving Lancing and the hard to access topography it snaked through provided little in the way of direct benefits to Chinese people. We had seen very little in the way of fishing, a mere fraction of the agricultural activity that was present in Southeast Asia, and virtually no transportation was possible due to the river’s rocky bed, untamed speed, and indirect course.

In the largely Tibetan mountain town of Deqin, parts of which sit at nearly 4000 metres above sea level, the practical uselessness of the Lancang was reinforced repeatedly by the people we spoke to. Cili Dingzhu, a Tibetan resident of Deqin replied with an emphatic “no, no, no,” when we asked if the Lancang provided anything for his community.

A Tibetan man drives along the mountain roads near Deqen, Yunan, China.

Cili Dingzhu drives along the mountain roads near Deqen.

In fact Cili Dingzhu had been hard pressed to think of a place anywhere in the area where people lived within walking distance of the river. When he did eventually remember once such village, we had driven through the mountains for more than an hour to reach it and found it to be little more than a cluster of houses perched on the steep valley walls. There were no pipes feeding them Lancang water, and no boats tied to the shore. Almost unnaturally blue and capped with intermittent patches of whitewater, in Yunnan’s rugged north the Lancang was simply an obstacle to be crossed, not a boon to be enjoyed.

In this sense the Chinese government had made the best possible use of the river as a means of developing their country. Other nations around the world had made excellent use of hydropower dams to build their economies and build their energy industries, and it would not be fair to expect China not to do the same. Yet we knew that as practical as China’s treatment of the Lancang might be, there were millions of people living the south who had an altogether different relationship with the river.

The Lancang (Mekong) river near Deqen, Yunnan, China. Fast flowing and oxydized to its blue-tint from the copper rich mountains, the river originates far to the north on the Tibetan plateau.

The Lancang (Mekong) river near Deqen.

In an ideal world nations would cooperate to make sure that natural resources were managed with the collective good in mind, but that world did not yet exist.

As we left Yunnan for the final phase of our journey on the Tibetan plateau, we were acutely aware of how much the river had changed since we had begun to follow it in Vietnam, and how greatly its importance in people’s lives varied from north to south.

“Wow, you’ve been on this river for a long way!” Cili Dingzhu remarked when we explained the nature of our trip. “Does it flow through Beijing?”

A River’s Tail is a year long collaborative multimedia journey exploring the Mekong river from sea to source. The following article originally appeared on the project’s main page and the images shown here represent only my part of the project’s creative output. To view the project as it was intended, I encourage you to visit the project’s main page by clicking here to follow the full journey.

Posted in A River's Tail, Blog, China, Environmental, The Mekong River, Water Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Tibetan Wine, Tug of War, and a Church in Buddha’s Land

Two villages compete in a basketball tournament in Cizhong, Yunan, China. Though the population of Cizhong is mostly Tibetan, more than 70% of the residents are Catholic, converted by missionaries who built a church in the village in the early 20th Century.

Two villages compete in a basketball tournament in Cizhong, Yunnan, China. Though the population of Cizhong is mostly Tibetan, more than 70% of the residents are Catholic, converted by missionaries who built a church in the village in the early 20th Century.

Possibly the last thing we expected to see upon arriving in the predominately Tibetan village of Cizhong was a crowd of hundreds watching a full court basketball game. We had come to Cizhong because of its most famous landmark – a century old Catholic church. Built by French missionaries in 1911 after their previous church was destroyed during a Chinese crackdown on foreign religions, the church had become the de facto centre of Catholicism in Yunnan. With a church in the heart of a largely Buddhist region, we had imagined Cizhong as some sort of spiritual enclave where the intermingling of religions was manifested in the streets by solemn monk-priests and billowing clouds of incense.

Whatever we expected, it was not basketball.

Two villages compete in a basketball tournament in Cizhong, Yunan, China. Though the population of Cizhong is mostly Tibetan, more than 70% of the residents are Catholic, converted by missionaries who built a church in the village in the early 20th Century.

Two villages compete in a basketball tournament.

It was the middle of losar the 15-day Tibetan lunar New Year holiday – and we had unwittingly stumbled upon the annual inter-village multi-day sports tournament. The women’s teams played first, and despite their general good sportsmanship and respect for the rules of the game, the competition was fierce. Even though it was barely 5º Celsius, sweat poured from the player’s and the spectators screamed encouragement from the sidelines.

At half time it was the middle-aged women of the area that took the stage, not to play basketball, but for a surprisingly intense tug of war competition. Strong and sturdy from their agricultural mountainous lifestyle, they were possessed of formidable stamina and they spared no energy in pulling for the pride of their village. The men in the audience were whipped into a frenzy, many of whom rushed onto the court to spur their women to victory. With multiple switching of sides and several back-to-back rounds, we lost track of which team was which and ultimately had no idea who had won. Judging from the laughter and general good cheer of the crowd, it didn’t seem to matter.

Women compete in an inter-village tug of war competition over the lunar new year holiday in Cizhong, Yunan, China.

Women compete in an inter-village tug of war competition over the lunar new year holiday.

Women compete in an inter-village tug of war competition over the lunar new year holiday in Cizhong, Yunan, China.

Women compete in an inter-village tug of war competition over the lunar new year holiday.

After the girls finished their basketball game (the home team lost, some of the players visibly upset), the men’s games began. They clearly took the sport seriously, with some of the teams even wearing customized NBA jerseys with their own names printed on the back.

Only when the tournament ended did we understand that there was more at stake than just hometown bragging rights. Numerous cash prizes of increasing value were handed out at the closing ceremony, honouring the winning teams, coaches, and best individual players – the most prestigious of which were paid out at 2000 Yuan (more than $300 USD), more than double the provincial minimum monthly wage.

An inter-village basketball tournament during the lunar new year holiday in Cizhong, Yunan, China.

An inter-village basketball tournament during the lunar new year holiday in Cizhong.

The majority of villagers gather to watch lunar new years events in the public square of Cizhong, Yunan, China.

The majority of villagers gather to watch lunar new years events in the public square of Cizhong.

The event was brought to a close with dance performances, an alternating fusion of traditional styles and modern pop ballads. There was something surreal about watching a group of children shake their bodies to Gangnam Style immediately after the well-choreographed rhythms of women dressed extravagantly in ceremonial silks, but such was the nature of the globalized 21st Century.

Grapes From God

When we met with Yao Fei, Cizhong’s resident priest who had been sent from Inner Mongolia to be the village’s spiritual leader, we learned that documenting the influence of Catholicism over 70% of the town’s population would not be as straightforward as we’d imagined as no photography was allowed inside the church. But there was another byproduct of the arrival of the French missionaries that was nearly as important economically to Cizhong as the church was spiritually: wine.

A Catholic priest from inner Mongolia is the resident father at a Cathilic church in Cizhong, Yunan, China. Though the population of Cizhong is mostly Tibetan, more than 70% of the residents are Catholic, converted by missionaries who built a church in the village in the early 20th Century.

Yao Fei, A Catholic priest from inner Mongolia is the resident father at a Cathilic church in Cizhong.

“The grapes were initially brought here by French missionaries,” Yao said. “At church, we need [wine] for mass. It represents Jesus’ blood. The wine culture started in the church…and now in the village many people make wine themselves.”

It didn’t take long to find locals engaged in the wine industry. 10 minutes into a walk along Cizhong’s main road, a sign mounted to the exterior wall of a house read (in both Mandarin and English), “French style wine available here”.

“My family started to grow grapes and make wine about 10 years ago,” Zeng Alan said. “10 years ago it was very poor here and the government encouraged us to grow grapes as part of a poverty alleviation program. The grapes helped my family to get out of poverty and now we use all our land to grow them. We are much better off.”

The moon rises over the Catholic church in Cizhong, Yunan, China. Though the population of Cizhong is mostly Tibetan, more than 70% of the residents are Catholic, converted by missionaries who built a church in the village in the early 20th Century.

The moon rises over the Catholic church in Cizhong.

In her early 60’s, Zeng Alan moved around her home with the speed of a much younger woman as she poured out small glasses of the bright red liquid for us to sample. Though not completely undrinkable, the wine bore semblance to French vintages only in that it was red and alcoholic. The sugar content was shockingly high, and it seemed certain that even a small quantity of the stuff would bring about an excessive hangover.

Zeng Alan pours homemade wine into plastic containers for sale in Cizhong, Yunan, China. First introduced by French missionaries, introduction of wine making has helped lift many villagers out of poverty.

Zeng Alan pours homemade wine into plastic containers for sale in Cizhong, Yunnan. First introduced by French missionaries, introduction of wine making has helped lift many villagers out of poverty.

Zeng Alan told us that while her speciality was the fermentation and transformation of the grapes into wine, it was her husband, Zeng Tei, who oversaw the vineyards themselves.

We found Tei on a mountainside above the village wandering through his rows of grape vines, stopping here and there to uproot a weed or pull off wilting leaves. The 64-year-old had married Alan and moved to Cizhong in 1983, he told us, but had only started growing grapes in 2002.

“Growing grapes is just great,” he said cheerfully, “Before I had to do very hard labor with no days off. My burdens are much less now and I have enough money to educate my three sons.”

Zeng Tei, 64, tends to his small vinyard in Cizhong, Yunan, China. First introduced by French missionaries, the grapes are used for making wine. The widespread introduction of grape cultivation has helped lift many villagers out of poverty.

Zeng Tei, 64, tends to his small vinyard in Cizhong, Yunnan. First introduced by French missionaries, the grapes are used for making wine. The widespread introduction of grape cultivation has helped lift many villagers out of poverty.

But growing grapes in Yunnan was not always easy. Just a few years after planting his first vines, Tei said, disaster struck. “At first we were very happy with the grapes, but in 2006 they got sick and most of them died. Only one tree survived well and actually produced 2.5kg of grapes.” Without much in the way of formal training, Tei nevertheless guessed that there was something special about that vine. The following season he grafted branches from it onto 10 other sickly vines and to his relief, most of them flourished.

“These new grapes are resistant to disease and have better yields than the original French variety,” Tei said, clearly proud of his accomplishment. “I started with just 10 of these and now I have over two mu (1333 square meters) of vines that give me more than five tonnes of grapes each year.”

This netted the family almost 2500 litres of wine each season, and with a value of roughly $5 USD per litre, this gave them an income well above the average small scale Yunnan farmer.

A woman dressed in traditional Tibetan clothes plays with her son over the lunar new year holiday in Cizhong, Yunan, China.

A woman dressed in traditional Tibetan clothes plays with her son over the lunar new year holiday in Cizhong.

A boy walks the streets of Cizhong, Yunan, China during the lunar new year holidays holding a toy AK-47.

A boy walks the streets of Cizhong during the lunar new year holidays holding a toy AK-47.

Though by this time of our travels in China we were used to hearing about how little the Lancang provided the people who lived along its banks, we were pleasantly surprised to find that there was a connection between the river and the Zeng’s prosperity. “The valley created by the river gives us a very good climate for growing grapes,” Tei said. “Even though grapes don’t need much water, the water we use comes from [a small tributary of] the Lancang.” He was quick to point out, however, that like everywhere else we had visited on the river, the water was not suitable for human consumption.

After buying a token bottle of the Zeng’s wine, we asked Tei if he felt anything towards the missionaries and their God for the gift of grapes.

“I don’t like religion. I only like grapes and chess.”

A River’s Tail is a year long collaborative multimedia journey exploring the Mekong river from sea to source. The following article originally appeared on the project’s main page and the images shown here represent only my part of the project’s creative output. To view the project as it was intended, I encourage you to visit the project’s main page by clicking here to follow the full journey.

Posted in A River's Tail, Blog, China, Environmental, The Mekong River, Water Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Drowning the Valley

Residents of Gongle village, Yunan, China, lay the foundations for a new house high up in the mountains to avoid the projected rising water level. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

Residents of Gongle village lay the foundations for a new house high up in the mountains to avoid the projected rising water level.

“They keep offering us more and more money, but it’s not about money,” the dump truck driver said. He was hauling loads of sand up the narrow mountain roads of the tiny village of Xialuoga to a construction site where he and his family were building a new house. They weren’t doing this because of an increase in fortune or fate, but rather because of the coming flood. Xialuoga’s farmlands were slated for inundation once the Tuoba hydropower dam on the Lancang was completed and residents had little choice but to prepare to move to higher ground, abandoning whatever low-lying assets they had built up over generations.

“Money comes and goes but our families need to be fed everyday,” the driver continued. “Without land, how can we be sure of their basic needs?”

A woman carries a load of canola to feed to her pigs in the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A woman carries a load of canola to feed to her pigs.

The forced relocation of people living along the banks of the Mekong was a story we had encountered repeatedly throughout our journey. From the cheaply-built relocation camps of Laos (needs link) to the Bunong ethnic minority groups fighting to save their land in northeastern Cambodia, the human cost of energy development was high throughout the region.

A father plays with his daughter in a small restaurant in the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A father plays with his daughter in a small restaurant.

But whereas in Laos and Cambodia we had been well aware of the situation in advance and had sought out the affected communities to purposely document their struggle, we had come to Xialuoga with the intention of capturing a portrait of peaceful agrarian life in China. It wasn’t until we had arrived and started speaking to locals that we learned the daily life we had come to photograph was soon to be under water.

A Pastoral Postcard

Located across the Lancang from the town of Baijixunxiang and connected to the outside world only by a steel-cabled suspension bridge, Xialuoga was so small as to not appear on Google Maps. Where searching for Baijixunxiang – itself tiny by Chinese standards – revealed a post office, several restaurants, a hotel, and a few parallel roads, the place where Xialuoga should have appeared was represented by only by name and a blank expanse of beige pixels. Only by switching to the photographic satellite view did the village appear, as if to indicate that, although Xialuoga may be physically there at the moment, it was probably best to forget about it.

The village of Gongle, Yunan, China, sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

The village of Gongle, Yunnan.

On the ground, however, Xialuoga was very much real and the picture postcard of simple pastoral life. While Yunnan had been beautiful in its entirety, the further north we moved, the more dramatic the landscape became. The mountains were rising ever higher as we approached the Himalayas and the snaking valley that held the Lancang correspondingly deepened.

Goats, donkeys, cows, and horses – all manner of domesticated animals grazed on the dry grasses that covered the hillsides, cautious but accepting of our company in the cold, fresh winds that gusted over the mountaintops. Bright yellow canola flowers, used to produce cooking oil and as fattening fodder for pigs, added striking patches of colour to the winter landscape. It was quiet, and incredibly beautiful.

A man walks through the canola fields surrounding the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A man walks through the canola fields surrounding Gongle

Goats line the mountainside overlooking the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

Goats line the mountainside overlooking the village.

“I’ve lived here my whole life,” Chao Yunsheng said. A weathered 78-year-old, Chao had lived through turbulent times. “Life is much better now. When I was a boy we often did not have any food to eat. Things are much easier now.”

Over the course of his life Chao had expanded his family’s land holdings to a respectable 20 mu (a mu is an old Chinese system of measurement still used in conjunction with the metric system. One mu equals 666.7 square meters). Though lack of irrigation systems and decreasing annual rainfall meant that he had long since quit growing rice, he nevertheless used his land to good effect by growing corn and grazing a herd of 90 goats.

“I have a lot of land now, and I have given it to my three sons,” Chao said. “My youngest son went to another province to work so I help [the other two] with the farming and animals.” Yet when the 900 megawatt Tuoba dam goes on line, much of his sons inheritance would be lost.

A goat herder cuts tree branches so the smaller goats can reach them in the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A goat herder cuts tree branches so the smaller goats can reach them.

A family tends to their farm animals in the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A family tends to their farm animals in the village of Gongle.

“The whole village will flood and we will have to move higher up the mountain. Out of the 20 mu we have, all but two will be lost. We will be able to keep grazing our goats, but there will only be a small area left for farming,” Chao told us. Considering that his crops account for roughly half the family’s income, the loss of 90% of his cultivatable land would be a serious financial blow.

Compensation, Contemplation, and Corruption

“I don’t know what’s happening,” 75-year-old Li Ruqi said as he sat in front of his small shop overlooking the Lancang. “This dam has been talked about for a long time, but there have been many delays and I have no idea when it will be finished. But if the government says I have to move, then I will have to move.”

Throughout Xialuoga and across the river in Baijixunxiang (the low-lying areas of which will also be flooded by Tuoba’s reservoir), locals shared the same uncertainty as to the timing of their relocation. Referring to the compensation package to be offered for evictees by the government, a hotel owner in Baijixunxiang said “We haven’t signed the deal, and many others haven’t either. We don’t know when it’s going to happen. If we don’t sign, they will probably force us to demolish the hotel anyways.”

The village of Yamen, Yunan, China, sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river. A hydropwer dam will innundate the village when completed, and most residents will be forcibly relocated.

The village of Yamen, Yunan, China, sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang (Mekong) river in Yunan, China.

The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang (Mekong) river in Yunnan, China.

The hotelier, who was hesitant to share his name, directed the majority of his anger towards local officials, who he accused of corruption. “Even if we get good compensation packages, much will be lost to corruption. [The dam builders] Sinohydro pay the money to local government officials and by the time it gets to us a lot of it will be gone. There have been many anti-corruption campaigns [across China], but this is a very remote place and they can do what they want here.”

Chao Yunsheng expressed similar frustrations, but was quick to point out that this was a problem at the local level and he placed no blame on the larger government apparatus. “The new president [Xi Jinping] is very good!” Chao said emphatically. “He gave out bags of rice to people with disabilities, which is very nice and the old presidents did not do. I have problems with my eyes, so I should have got two bags of rice but I only got one. This is proof of the corruption.”

Li Ruqi expressed even more faith in the national government, telling us that “I have no concerns for the future of my six children. The government will look after them.”

A woman stands on the hillside overlooking the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A woman stands on the hillside overlooking the village of Gongle.

A horse grazes on the mountain sides overlooking the village of Gongle, Yunan, China. Gongle sits along the banks of the Lancang (Mekong) river, but will be flooded by the completion of a nearby hydropower dam, necessitating the relocation of most residents.

A horse grazes on the mountain sides overlooking the village of Gongle.

Though almost everyone we spoke to in Baijixunxiang and Xialuoga said they had been visited by surveyors who took measurements of their property, none had a clear picture of how much they would be compensated. Chao Yunsheng, however, said he thought he knew the value of at least one thing – his family’s ancestral graves. “I heard that we will be paid 1200 Yuan (roughly $185 USD) per grave.”

While Chao’s prediction about the value of his ancestor’s remains were unconfirmed, one thing was certain: when Tuoba’s 60m deep reservoir arrived, life in Xialuoga would change forever.

A River’s Tail is a year long collaborative multimedia journey exploring the Mekong river from sea to source. The following article originally appeared on the project’s main page and the images shown here represent only my part of the project’s creative output. To view the project as it was intended, I encourage you to visit the project’s main page by clicking here to follow the full journey.

Posted in A River's Tail, Blog, China, Environmental, The Mekong River, Water Tagged , , , , , , , , |